Welcome to Design for ASD, a blog about design for the autism spectrum

This is a blog about design from my perspective as a person with autism (self-diagnosed with Nonverbal Learning Disability). I cover both design issues for users with ASD (Autism Spectrum Disorder), and particular designs I happen to like, while trying to give reasons why they may appeal to someone with autism. I’m not a professional designer, just someone who likes what he sees as good design. My perspective as a design-minded person with autism may be of interest to others (particularly those with ASD and anyone designing for them).

Any estimate of the ASD population is controversial, but according to the CDC about 1 in 68 children in the United States has been diagnosed with an Autism Spectrum Disorder, and the percentage has been rising (see chart below). That may seem a low percentage to some, but there’s a large overlap between the special needs of the ASD community and senior citizens (for instance, compared to the average person, many individuals in both groups tend to have poorer coordination, and are more easily confused by audio-visual stimuli).

Add the ASD and Senior demographics together, and you have a large consumer base for designs specific to their shared needs. In addition, the percentage of persons aged 65 or older is projected to climb rapidly throughout the developed world. In many cases, the designer’s ‘typical user’ profile may need to be modified to account for the growing ASD-Seniors market share, and this can often be done without compromising the general appeal of the product.

NOTE ON TERMINOLOGY: I was recently informed that some persons with autism object to the label ‘autistic’. I have therefore ceased to use the term in new posts. However, I lack time to remove it from old posts. I also re-blog other bloggers, and many of them use the word (re-blogged posts are not editable). I therefore hope for the reader’s kind understanding in both regards. 

The Editor, DesignForASD

Not Your Mother’s Fitted Sheet

Two big problems with fitted sheets:

a) Lifting the mattress to get them on/off. This is worse if your bed is against the wall, especially in the corner!

b) They don’t fold neatly away. Which is a problem if you’re obsessed with everything having straight lines, or at least not looking like a scrunched-up rag.

Thankfully QuickZip has the perfect solution. It’s basically an extra-secure fitted sheet with a top that unzips for changing, and folds neatly away. You have to see it to believe it!

Video from QuikZip’s YouTube channel.

Visit QuickZip to find out more.

The Hidden Struggle of Working Women With Autism

Autistic women can go for years without diagnosis, and struggle at work as a result. One company is determined to do something about it. Rachael Lucas’s “long history of walking out of very good jobs” began in her 20s after she quit her postgraduate degree at the University of Ulster. Working in different fields as […]

via ‘It’s Exhausting’: The Hidden Struggle of Working Women with Autism — Someone Somewhere

Blinkist: Read Four Books in One Day

For some autistics, reading can be a chore, especially if they have other conditions like ADD that often accompany autism. Blinkist is a useful service that summarizes popular non-fiction books into small chunks you can read in about 15 minutes, on your computer, tablet or smartphone. It’s a subscription service, but they offer a free trial. Try it out here!

Developing an Educational Plan for the Student with NLD

“Ten common neurobehavioral characteristics of NLD are described below, along with suggestions for teacher intervention which should be considered when developing an individualized educational plan for the student with NLD. The suggestions given are general and should always be adapted to the unique needs of the individual student in your care. ”

Read the rest here.

Article courtesy of LD OnLine: The Educators’ Guide to Learning Disabilities and ADHD

What I Wish I Could Tell My Boss: ‘My Autism is not a Problem’

Architects working in office.

“Yes, I can hear you whispering two offices away through closed doors. Just like I can hear washing machines three doors down on my road or my partner opening a plaster. Yes, I know my eye contact is poor, but don’t bully me into making it. And do not touch me. It makes my skin burn so I’d rather you didn’t. Yes, I do have very rigid routines and travelling alone is difficult, but I manage. I need you to understand that these things may seem crippling to you, but actually I have a pretty good life. A couple of good friends, partner, planned holiday and a mix of interests.”

Read the rest here

Article courtesy of Guardian News & Media Ltd

Study finds autistic adults are more consistent with their choices

Someone Somewhere

People with autism are less likely to be influenced by marketing ploys when choosing between consumer products.

Autism
People with autism are thought to focus more on detail and less on the bigger picture.

A new research has revealed that adults with autism disorder may show more consistent choices in high-level decision-making tasks and are less likely to show a cognitive bias because they are not influenced by the way choices are presented. The findings indicate that individuals with autism are less susceptible to the effects of decoy options when evaluating and choosing the “best” product among several options relative to individuals without autism.

“People with autism are indeed more consistent in their choices than the neurotypical population. From an economic perspective, this suggests that people with autism are more rational and less likely to be influenced by the way choices are presented,” said George Farmer, psychology researcher at the University…

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April is Autism Awareness Month!

By Lisa Ackerman Hi April! You’re back! My 17th autism awareness month is kicking off in hours. (Yes, I am tracking the hours!) Here we go again! This is a great opportunity to dig in, inspire and motivate our community to move awareness into action for this April. Many diseases and conditions have […]

via #Autism Awareness NEEDS ACTION during April — Moving Autism Forward by Team TACA