What I Wish I Could Tell My Boss: ‘My Autism is not a Problem’

Architects working in office.

“Yes, I can hear you whispering two offices away through closed doors. Just like I can hear washing machines three doors down on my road or my partner opening a plaster. Yes, I know my eye contact is poor, but don’t bully me into making it. And do not touch me. It makes my skin burn so I’d rather you didn’t. Yes, I do have very rigid routines and travelling alone is difficult, but I manage. I need you to understand that these things may seem crippling to you, but actually I have a pretty good life. A couple of good friends, partner, planned holiday and a mix of interests.”

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Article courtesy of Guardian News & Media Ltd

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Study finds autistic adults are more consistent with their choices

SOMEONE SOMEWHERE

People with autism are less likely to be influenced by marketing ploys when choosing between consumer products.

Autism
People with autism are thought to focus more on detail and less on the bigger picture.

A new research has revealed that adults with autism disorder may show more consistent choices in high-level decision-making tasks and are less likely to show a cognitive bias because they are not influenced by the way choices are presented. The findings indicate that individuals with autism are less susceptible to the effects of decoy options when evaluating and choosing the “best” product among several options relative to individuals without autism.

“People with autism are indeed more consistent in their choices than the neurotypical population. From an economic perspective, this suggests that people with autism are more rational and less likely to be influenced by the way choices are presented,” said George Farmer, psychology researcher at the University…

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April is Autism Awareness Month!

By Lisa Ackerman Hi April! You’re back! My 17th autism awareness month is kicking off in hours. (Yes, I am tracking the hours!) Here we go again! This is a great opportunity to dig in, inspire and motivate our community to move awareness into action for this April. Many diseases and conditions have […]

via #Autism Awareness NEEDS ACTION during April — Moving Autism Forward by Team TACA

Autism as an adult: ‘On the many days I spend alone I forget how to talk’

Image source – Wikimedia; Public Domain: click here for details

“I was diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder in my 40s. Like many adults who’ve slipped through the diagnostic net due to being high-functioning, born too early, or simply female, I’ve spent a lifetime trying to figure out the lifelong social and sensory difficulties of autism. That none of us wake up cured at 18 still appears to mystify some professionals. That we might still benefit from some support, however late the diagnosis, does too. A late diagnosis of autism meant I struggled with the alien codes of small talk and office politics – until I started work at an autism charity”

Why I Love Knowing I Have High-Functioning Autism

 

Image source – Wikimedia; public domain: Click here for details

“Lost and directionless, I bounced from one job to the next – my part-time work included time at a call centre, a property developer and a posh dating agency – but I was left feeling exposed and alone by complicated office politics, illogical workplace rules and the sensory overload triggered by fluorescent lighting, ringing phones and the background hum of conversation.”

 

Read the rest at The Telegraph.

When you were a kid it was a lot easier. In college you almost had to be trying not to make friends. But then you’re an adult. You get busy with work. Your friends get busy with work. People get married. Have kids. And pretty soon being “close” means a text message twice a year.…

via This Is How To Make Friends As An Adult: 5 Secrets Backed By Research — Barking Up The Wrong Tree