No More Sloppy Collars

Many on the autism spectrum find it annoying when certain things are not ‘just so’, including their attire. For me, the ‘sloppy collar’ was a minor irritant, especially if I’m wearing a polo shirt or other soft fabric. Thankfully, there’s a couple of tricks that may help with that. One is a collar shaper like the one in the video below:

Video credit: Stiff Collar Stay

To buy, go to

A good addition to the collar shaper are collar stays to keep the collar tips from curling. For collars that don’t have built-in pockets for stays (e.g. polo shirts), you can use stick-on stays like these from Wingmate:

Video credit: Wingmate

To buy, go to

No More Tying Shoelaces

Tying shoelaces can be a challenge to children with autism, and shoe-wearers of all kinds find it odd that we’re still fastening our shoes with bits of string in the 21st Century.  Zubits has revolutionized the process with their magnetic closures, which you lace into once, and then fasten and unfasten with the magnetic buckle. They come in a variety of colors and work with any standard lace-up shoe.

Video by Zubits

Fight Negative Thoughts with the ‘Three Good Things Diary’

Negative thoughts are a recurring problem for anyone, but especially for many on the autism spectrum. Research has shown that keeping a daily record of positive things that happen to you (even small things) can help counter-balance negative thinking. In the video above from happierdotcom, Dr. Martin Seligman explains more about the Three Good Things Exercise.

Not Your Mother’s Fitted Sheet

Two big problems with fitted sheets:

a) Lifting the mattress to get them on/off. This is worse if your bed is against the wall, especially in the corner!

b) They don’t fold neatly away. Which is a problem if you’re obsessed with everything having straight lines, or at least not looking like a scrunched-up rag.

Thankfully QuickZip has the perfect solution. It’s basically an extra-secure fitted sheet with a top that unzips for changing, and folds neatly away. You have to see it to believe it!

Video from QuikZip’s YouTube channel.

Visit QuickZip to find out more.

The Hidden Struggle of Working Women With Autism

Autistic women can go for years without diagnosis, and struggle at work as a result. One company is determined to do something about it. Rachael Lucas’s “long history of walking out of very good jobs” began in her 20s after she quit her postgraduate degree at the University of Ulster. Working in different fields as […]

via ‘It’s Exhausting’: The Hidden Struggle of Working Women with Autism — Someone Somewhere

Blinkist: Read Four Books in One Day

For some autistics, reading can be a chore, especially if they have other conditions like ADD that often accompany autism. Blinkist is a useful service that summarizes popular non-fiction books into small chunks you can read in about 15 minutes, on your computer, tablet or smartphone. It’s a subscription service, but they offer a free trial. Try it out here!

Developing an Educational Plan for the Student with NLD

“Ten common neurobehavioral characteristics of NLD are described below, along with suggestions for teacher intervention which should be considered when developing an individualized educational plan for the student with NLD. The suggestions given are general and should always be adapted to the unique needs of the individual student in your care. ”

Read the rest here.

Article courtesy of LD OnLine: The Educators’ Guide to Learning Disabilities and ADHD

What I Wish I Could Tell My Boss: ‘My Autism is not a Problem’

Architects working in office.

“Yes, I can hear you whispering two offices away through closed doors. Just like I can hear washing machines three doors down on my road or my partner opening a plaster. Yes, I know my eye contact is poor, but don’t bully me into making it. And do not touch me. It makes my skin burn so I’d rather you didn’t. Yes, I do have very rigid routines and travelling alone is difficult, but I manage. I need you to understand that these things may seem crippling to you, but actually I have a pretty good life. A couple of good friends, partner, planned holiday and a mix of interests.”

Read the rest here

Article courtesy of Guardian News & Media Ltd